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Why Foreign Missions? 20b. The Gospel According to Paul in the Corinthian Correspondence, Gordon Fee

Why Foreign Missions?  20b. The Gospel According to Paul in the Corinthian Correspondence, Gordon Fee
The previous study offered two ways to explore the content of the Gospel in the early Church: by examining confessional formulae and the speeches of Acts.  In this study, a third approach to identifying the Gospel will be presented through an essay by +Gordon D. Fee.[1]  His method is to examine Paul’s correspondence with the Corinthian church.  While his method again demonstrates that the Gospel is focussed on Jesus, it identifies several dimensions to the Gospel that expand points noted in the previous study.

The Gospel has Content First, Fee points out that the Gospel has a content (pp. 112f).  Existentialist eisegesis of the 20th century attempted to argue that, originally, the Church spoke of the act of believing rather than what was to be believed.  While such a distinction is surely ludicrous in its own right, one might, nevertheless, point out that Paul does indeed speak as tho…

Why Foreign Missions? 20a1. The Gospel According to Paul: Sermons and Confessions

Why Foreign Missions?  20a1. The Gospel According to Paul: Sermons and Confessions
What Gospel did the early Church take to the Jews and Gentiles of the Roman world outside Israel?  This study, focussed mostly on Paul, begins a section that seeks to identify the content of the early Church’s ‘Gospel.’  Here, I will present how several scholars, such as C. H. Dodd and James D. G. Dunn, have approached and answered the question, ‘What is the Gospel According to Paul?’ by exploring sermons and confessional formulae in Acts and Paul.[1]  The next studies will expand this discussion.
Challenges in the Twentieth Century
The twentieth century saw several challenges to coming up with a content to the Gospel.  Michael Green discussed these in Evangelism in the Early Church.[2]  First, there is the question of whether different scholars can arrive at the same results when reviewing the evidence from the New Testament.  Is there a unity to the content of the Gospel?  Second, existentialists (such…

Why Foreign Missions? 19. The Pauline Missions According to Acts

Why Foreign Missions? 19. The Pauline Missions According to Acts
Luke presents the mission of the Church beyond Israel largely through journeys of Paul and his companions. The Gentile mission is anticipated from the beginning of Acts, as Jesus declares that his disciples will be witnesses from Jerusalem to Judea to Samaria to the ends of the earth (Acts 1.8; thus fulfilling Is. 59.6). This Gentile mission starts with the diaspora Jews visiting on Pentecost, who take the Gospel back to their home regions (Acts 2.5-11).  It continues as the Gospel is taken to Samaritans (Acts 8.5, 25), to an Ethiopian eunuch (Acts 8.27ff), and to a Roman Centurion's family (Acts 10.1ff).  This study, however, presents the data from Acts for the Pauline missions and offers some external data that helps us to ascertain the dates for these missions.
FIRST MISSIONARY JOURNEY (WITH BARNABAS)
     Antioch to Seleucia to Cyprus (13.4-6) (from Salamis to Paphos)      Paphos to Perga in Pamphylia to Pisidian …

Engaging the Bible in Mission Theology: Scholarship, David Bosch (2)

Engaging the Bible in Mission Theology Scholarship: Scholarship, David Bosch (2)


David Bosch, Transforming Mission: Paradigm Shifts in Theology of Mission (Maryknoll: Orbis, 1991).
These are short notes on the mission paradigms that Bosch identifies in Church history, without comment.

Bosch argues that identifying 'paradigms' is a helpful way to understand the history of theology and mission. In this, he is developing the notion of paradigm shifts in theology as argued by Hans Küng ("Was meint Paradigmenwachsel?" in Küng and David Tracy (eds.), Paradigm changes in Theology (NY: Crossrod, 1984, 1989 ET).  Bosch finds six paradigm shifts in 2,000 years of Christian history.  He does not believe that one gives way to another so much as one is added to existing paradigms.  I will simply present his analysis briefly, noting that this remains one of the major studies in recent times of mission theology and history (even though I have my doubts about the usefulness of a paradi…

Engaging the Bible in Mission Theology: Scholarship, David Bosch (1)

Engaging the Bible in Mission Theology Scholarship: Scholarship, David Bosch (1)
David Bosch, Transforming Mission: Paradigm Shifts in Theology of Mission (Maryknoll: Orbis, 1991).
After initial chapters on the mission theology of certain New Testament authors, Bosch surveys the history of missions.  He structures his historical survey by identifying six paradigms for mission in Church history.  He attempts to associate key Biblical texts with each of the paradigms for mission.  Bosch’s views on which Scriptures go with which paradigms of mission form the focus of the following study, with a very brief caution and comment of my own at the end.  In the next study, a deeper look at Bosch's paradigms for mission will be presented.  An outline format should help readers scan this study quickly.
1.Apocalyptic Paradigm of primitive Christianity a.This is the period during which the New Testament documents were being written and when the New Testament canon was being defined. b.Salvation was …